Just Curious…

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I had a long whiny post yesterday which I deleted. I’m sorta glad. I’m less whiny this morning. I think it’s because I actually did something in the way of scholarship this morning! Will wonders never cease? The deadline for the panel for which I’d like to submit an abstract is this Saturday. I don’t think my idea is as good as the one I had last year, but maybe I can come up with something. I missed the deadline for the panel which I sorta had something ready for based on a talk I gave on campus in October, but honestly, I’m not interested in writing that paper really. I’d rather write the paper for this new idea. Also, I do really want to turn what I did last year and what I hope to do this year into something larger. Of course that means actually working on them beyond the conference paper aspect of the issue, but just like this time last year, I’m moving in the right direction. The challenge this time will be not to stop once I get to the conference paper. Of course this is all presuming that my abstract gets accepted.

Yesterday we went for a run outside in this nasty ass weather here. It was negative something with the windchill. But I found my gortex running shoes, which it turns out, without my orthotics, are way too big**. I had to cut the run short 25 minutes (we still ran for 45) because I could feel the blisters. I was part right. I *had* blisters. The split during the run. My socks were filled with blood. My heals throb with every heartbeat.  I have a ginormous one in the arch of my right foot. The one on the arch of the left half split during the run and then another blister formed on top. That freaking hurts! I was like a little old lady last night and soaked my feet for almost an hour in epsom salts, which helped a bit but damn they hurt going into that water! I don’t know if I can protect my feet enough in their utter rawness to be able to go back out today. I really need to, but we’ll see. It’s really really cold out there, too. -9 with the windchill. Yowza!

Anyway, reading something last night not related to the coming semester and working on something this morning that interests me outside of my teaching has improved my mood especially since STILL students are complaining (I spoke too soon on Monday) about their grades. The latest–"I didn’t plagiarize on purpose. I did everything right. I don’t know why Dr. Nola gave me a bad grade. I might lose my scholarship now because of her. It’s not my fault. I didn’t mean to if I did and I did everything right!" Uh, no, clearly you didn’t. Turning in pages of a source you used also doesn’t take the place of an actual works cited page. Mentioning the author of the quote but not putting quotes around the direct quote and not giving the page number and writing it as if you are giving your interpretation or paraphrase of what the author says while actually using a direct quote is also plagiarism, as I have already explained to you. And just because you changed "a" to "the" and moved his word from the end of the sentence to the beginning of the sentence without quoting, well, that’s shady, too, missy. And don’t pretend you "didn’t know" because I showed you, on your other paper, exactly what you did, why it was wrong, and how to freaking fix it!

Since I’m on the subject of plagiarism and fraudulent writing, which I had not intended this post to be about, but since I’m on it anyway, how often do you guys deal with that? I think I’d feel less anxious if I felt that the administration had my back, but quite frankly, I don’t think they do, even the higher ups. I saw a student before the end of the semester who had been written up twice, which is supposed to be dismissal from the institution, or I believe ze had, still walking around taking classes. I just feel like as long as students are still willing to pay for their tuition, they get to keep cheating and plagiarizing. I know Super Awesome Colleague busts about as many students for plagiarizing as I do. But I feel like we are the only ones. I know that my colleagues in the sciences have more problems with cheating than with actual plagiarism, but I’m trying to figure out if the amount of cheating and plagiarism that I deal with, if that’s unusual or usual for a SLAC. I’ve had at least 9 in the last year. But I never hear of any of my colleagues, aside from Super Awesome Colleague complain about this. And I don’t want to suggest that others aren’t doing their jobs, but are we just super vigilant? Do these students try this in our classes because we’re young and they think we’re stupid? We both have reputations already for busting students for this, at least I think we do. Some of my other colleagues have just quit giving research paper assignments, even for their 300-400 level classes just so they don’t have to deal with the issue, which I don’t agree with that either. I don’t really try too hard to come up with "plagiarism proof" assignments because the ones who want to cheat are going to anyway, so I’m not going to create extra work for myself by trying to figure out a way for them not to cheat–that shouldn’t be my job, trying to keep students from cheating, which is why I don’t care if they use laptops for in class essays. If they can’t "resist" the urge to cheat, then they shouldn’t use their laptops. I have other things to do with my life than to help students not cheat. Some argue that I’m setting students up for failure by allowing them to use laptops for in class essays. But I honestly don’t see how that means I’m inviting them to cheat. Typed essays are easier for me to read than their handwriting.

The thing that I’m still pissed off about is that busting them is time consuming. Even the easy ones. It involves reports, photo copying, collating the evidence–it needs to be done, but what cheeses me off is that I get the feeling that 75% of my colleagues just don’t want to be bothered with it so they don’t do the work to write them up and find some other reason to fail them or give their papers a lower grade or whatever. Because I really don’t hear any of my colleagues complain about this, and most of them really seem shocked at the amount of plagiarism I find. Or maybe I’m being unfair to my colleagues. Maybe they do complain, and I just don’t hear about it. Perhaps I’m not being fair. I’m sure there are lots of students who have who slipped under my radar, but it just annoys me that as long as students are willing to keep paying the tuition, it doesn’t matter. Sometimes it’s really frustrating that the college is so short sighted. But whatever. I don’t want to get into a discussion of who "deserves" to be in college and to be down on all students who enter the college on academic probation. A handful of them needed distance and a new environment in order to succeed. I’m not talking about those students. And I don’t want to focus on being judgmental about "bad" vs. "good" students.

So I’m just curious–do you guys deal with this a lot? Or is 9 in one year really not that many and I’ve overreacting here? Do you take time to try to come up with "plagiarism proof" assignments and/or do things to "remove temptation" for the students? Do I set them up for failure or am I being too hard on myself or am I being too hard on my colleagues, students, and/or institution? Or do I just suck it up as part of the job and plan to set aside time for having to deal with at least 3-4 cases a semester? Argh.

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24 responses »

  1. plagiarism
    I had a lot more plagiarism cases in my first two or three years here, but I haven’t had a case in a few semesters now.
    One thing that I do believe helped was that my university instituted admissions standards. Seriously: there was a direct correlation between increased standards and decreased plagiarism.
    I did tweak my assignments until it became the case that plagiarizing is more of a pain than just writing your own paper. Partly I give them more freedom – not less – and I give them more “steps” that show them how to get to the end product for which I’m looking. Transparency plus autonomy, I’ve found, equals less plagiarism. In other words, if you force a student to write on something over which they feel like they have no control or of which they have little knowledge, they’ll feel more tempted to plagiarize.
    But also: I now give a speech on the first day, which I do think makes a difference. If it is the case that students plagiarize out of insecurity (which I do believe) or out of believing that they left something too late and that plagiarizing is the only way to pass it (which I also believe), students need to know two things: 1) that you’d rather get their own original crappy work so that you can help them, and 2) that you’ll catch them if they plagiarize. So my speech goes something like, “Don’t cheat and don’t plagiarize in my class because you’ll get caught and your life will suck. But that’s not the most important reason not to plagiarize. And even the ethics of it aren’t the most important reason not to plagiarize, though of course those matter. The most important reason for you not to cheat or to plagiarize is that if you submit work that isn’t your own, I can’t teach you, and you can’t learn. At that point, you might as well just drop the class. Don’t waste your time in putting together work that’s not your own, and don’t waste my time by making me look at it, catch you, and then punish you for it. If you don’t want to do the work, then you don’t want to learn. You want to waste the money that you’re paying, and you want to waste your time. There are much more fun ways to waste your money and time. Seriously. So, let me teach you, ok?”
    Not a single plagiarist since I started giving that speech, though, to be fair, I do get a good amount of really shitty papers at first.

  2. plagiarism

    I had a lot more plagiarism cases in my first two or three years here, but I haven’t had a case in a few semesters now.

    One thing that I do believe helped was that my university instituted admissions standards. Seriously: there was a direct correlation between increased standards and decreased plagiarism.

    I did tweak my assignments until it became the case that plagiarizing is more of a pain than just writing your own paper. Partly I give them more freedom – not less – and I give them more “steps” that show them how to get to the end product for which I’m looking. Transparency plus autonomy, I’ve found, equals less plagiarism. In other words, if you force a student to write on something over which they feel like they have no control or of which they have little knowledge, they’ll feel more tempted to plagiarize.

    But also: I now give a speech on the first day, which I do think makes a difference. If it is the case that students plagiarize out of insecurity (which I do believe) or out of believing that they left something too late and that plagiarizing is the only way to pass it (which I also believe), students need to know two things: 1) that you’d rather get their own original crappy work so that you can help them, and 2) that you’ll catch them if they plagiarize. So my speech goes something like, “Don’t cheat and don’t plagiarize in my class because you’ll get caught and your life will suck. But that’s not the most important reason not to plagiarize. And even the ethics of it aren’t the most important reason not to plagiarize, though of course those matter. The most important reason for you not to cheat or to plagiarize is that if you submit work that isn’t your own, I can’t teach you, and you can’t learn. At that point, you might as well just drop the class. Don’t waste your time in putting together work that’s not your own, and don’t waste my time by making me look at it, catch you, and then punish you for it. If you don’t want to do the work, then you don’t want to learn. You want to waste the money that you’re paying, and you want to waste your time. There are much more fun ways to waste your money and time. Seriously. So, let me teach you, ok?”

    Not a single plagiarist since I started giving that speech, though, to be fair, I do get a good amount of really shitty papers at first.

  3. plagiarism

    I had a lot more plagiarism cases in my first two or three years here, but I haven’t had a case in a few semesters now.

    One thing that I do believe helped was that my university instituted admissions standards. Seriously: there was a direct correlation between increased standards and decreased plagiarism.

    I did tweak my assignments until it became the case that plagiarizing is more of a pain than just writing your own paper. Partly I give them more freedom – not less – and I give them more “steps” that show them how to get to the end product for which I’m looking. Transparency plus autonomy, I’ve found, equals less plagiarism. In other words, if you force a student to write on something over which they feel like they have no control or of which they have little knowledge, they’ll feel more tempted to plagiarize.

    But also: I now give a speech on the first day, which I do think makes a difference. If it is the case that students plagiarize out of insecurity (which I do believe) or out of believing that they left something too late and that plagiarizing is the only way to pass it (which I also believe), students need to know two things: 1) that you’d rather get their own original crappy work so that you can help them, and 2) that you’ll catch them if they plagiarize. So my speech goes something like, “Don’t cheat and don’t plagiarize in my class because you’ll get caught and your life will suck. But that’s not the most important reason not to plagiarize. And even the ethics of it aren’t the most important reason not to plagiarize, though of course those matter. The most important reason for you not to cheat or to plagiarize is that if you submit work that isn’t your own, I can’t teach you, and you can’t learn. At that point, you might as well just drop the class. Don’t waste your time in putting together work that’s not your own, and don’t waste my time by making me look at it, catch you, and then punish you for it. If you don’t want to do the work, then you don’t want to learn. You want to waste the money that you’re paying, and you want to waste your time. There are much more fun ways to waste your money and time. Seriously. So, let me teach you, ok?”

    Not a single plagiarist since I started giving that speech, though, to be fair, I do get a good amount of really shitty papers at first.

  4. plagiarism

    I had a lot more plagiarism cases in my first two or three years here, but I haven’t had a case in a few semesters now.

    One thing that I do believe helped was that my university instituted admissions standards. Seriously: there was a direct correlation between increased standards and decreased plagiarism.

    I did tweak my assignments until it became the case that plagiarizing is more of a pain than just writing your own paper. Partly I give them more freedom – not less – and I give them more “steps” that show them how to get to the end product for which I’m looking. Transparency plus autonomy, I’ve found, equals less plagiarism. In other words, if you force a student to write on something over which they feel like they have no control or of which they have little knowledge, they’ll feel more tempted to plagiarize.

    But also: I now give a speech on the first day, which I do think makes a difference. If it is the case that students plagiarize out of insecurity (which I do believe) or out of believing that they left something too late and that plagiarizing is the only way to pass it (which I also believe), students need to know two things: 1) that you’d rather get their own original crappy work so that you can help them, and 2) that you’ll catch them if they plagiarize. So my speech goes something like, “Don’t cheat and don’t plagiarize in my class because you’ll get caught and your life will suck. But that’s not the most important reason not to plagiarize. And even the ethics of it aren’t the most important reason not to plagiarize, though of course those matter. The most important reason for you not to cheat or to plagiarize is that if you submit work that isn’t your own, I can’t teach you, and you can’t learn. At that point, you might as well just drop the class. Don’t waste your time in putting together work that’s not your own, and don’t waste my time by making me look at it, catch you, and then punish you for it. If you don’t want to do the work, then you don’t want to learn. You want to waste the money that you’re paying, and you want to waste your time. There are much more fun ways to waste your money and time. Seriously. So, let me teach you, ok?”

    Not a single plagiarist since I started giving that speech, though, to be fair, I do get a good amount of really shitty papers at first.

  5. I love Dr. Crazy’s speech about wasting one’s time and money. I’m tempted to steal it! (Oh no, I’d be plagiarizing!)
    I have a colleague here who really believes that students plagiarize because they leave something until the last minute and panic — and zie says that to students. Zie basically hands the paper back and tells them to do it over, being friendly and paternalistic the whole time. I appreciate how friendly and student learning-focused this is to students. On the other hand, I’ve heard Zie give this speech to students in the hall, and I also think that these students do not learn what’s at stake in plagiarizing in terms of ethics, intellectual property, and just plain stealing. I, on the other hand, state very stiff penalties for plagiarizing on the syllabus, and discuss the issue of unintentional plagiarism that comes from students just not understanding how to handle quotes or using other people’s ideas properly.
    But I do understand that students can plagiarize without really knowing they’re doing it. I had a student back in Grad City who was taking a second class from me who plagiarized, including a long paragraph taken from the internet without properly sourcing it, indenting, etc. Really, it was just a mess. When I told her about it, she started crying. The fact that I already knew this student from a previous semester drove home to me that maybe she really didn’t know. So I think each plagiarism case is different and don’t handle each the same way. If I caught students getting a paper from a paper mill, I’d throw the book at ’em.
    All that said, my assignments are really specific, so if students are plagiarizing, they’re buying custom papers. I also require all the draftwork to be turned in, which also makes plagiarizing more time-consuming. I haven’t caught a student here yet, nor have I really suspected it.
    ~EE

  6. I love Dr. Crazy’s speech about wasting one’s time and money. I’m tempted to steal it! (Oh no, I’d be plagiarizing!)

    I have a colleague here who really believes that students plagiarize because they leave something until the last minute and panic — and zie says that to students. Zie basically hands the paper back and tells them to do it over, being friendly and paternalistic the whole time. I appreciate how friendly and student learning-focused this is to students. On the other hand, I’ve heard Zie give this speech to students in the hall, and I also think that these students do not learn what’s at stake in plagiarizing in terms of ethics, intellectual property, and just plain stealing. I, on the other hand, state very stiff penalties for plagiarizing on the syllabus, and discuss the issue of unintentional plagiarism that comes from students just not understanding how to handle quotes or using other people’s ideas properly.

    But I do understand that students can plagiarize without really knowing they’re doing it. I had a student back in Grad City who was taking a second class from me who plagiarized, including a long paragraph taken from the internet without properly sourcing it, indenting, etc. Really, it was just a mess. When I told her about it, she started crying. The fact that I already knew this student from a previous semester drove home to me that maybe she really didn’t know. So I think each plagiarism case is different and don’t handle each the same way. If I caught students getting a paper from a paper mill, I’d throw the book at ’em.

    All that said, my assignments are really specific, so if students are plagiarizing, they’re buying custom papers. I also require all the draftwork to be turned in, which also makes plagiarizing more time-consuming. I haven’t caught a student here yet, nor have I really suspected it.

    ~EE

  7. I love Dr. Crazy’s speech about wasting one’s time and money. I’m tempted to steal it! (Oh no, I’d be plagiarizing!)

    I have a colleague here who really believes that students plagiarize because they leave something until the last minute and panic — and zie says that to students. Zie basically hands the paper back and tells them to do it over, being friendly and paternalistic the whole time. I appreciate how friendly and student learning-focused this is to students. On the other hand, I’ve heard Zie give this speech to students in the hall, and I also think that these students do not learn what’s at stake in plagiarizing in terms of ethics, intellectual property, and just plain stealing. I, on the other hand, state very stiff penalties for plagiarizing on the syllabus, and discuss the issue of unintentional plagiarism that comes from students just not understanding how to handle quotes or using other people’s ideas properly.

    But I do understand that students can plagiarize without really knowing they’re doing it. I had a student back in Grad City who was taking a second class from me who plagiarized, including a long paragraph taken from the internet without properly sourcing it, indenting, etc. Really, it was just a mess. When I told her about it, she started crying. The fact that I already knew this student from a previous semester drove home to me that maybe she really didn’t know. So I think each plagiarism case is different and don’t handle each the same way. If I caught students getting a paper from a paper mill, I’d throw the book at ’em.

    All that said, my assignments are really specific, so if students are plagiarizing, they’re buying custom papers. I also require all the draftwork to be turned in, which also makes plagiarizing more time-consuming. I haven’t caught a student here yet, nor have I really suspected it.

    ~EE

  8. I love Dr. Crazy’s speech about wasting one’s time and money. I’m tempted to steal it! (Oh no, I’d be plagiarizing!)

    I have a colleague here who really believes that students plagiarize because they leave something until the last minute and panic — and zie says that to students. Zie basically hands the paper back and tells them to do it over, being friendly and paternalistic the whole time. I appreciate how friendly and student learning-focused this is to students. On the other hand, I’ve heard Zie give this speech to students in the hall, and I also think that these students do not learn what’s at stake in plagiarizing in terms of ethics, intellectual property, and just plain stealing. I, on the other hand, state very stiff penalties for plagiarizing on the syllabus, and discuss the issue of unintentional plagiarism that comes from students just not understanding how to handle quotes or using other people’s ideas properly.

    But I do understand that students can plagiarize without really knowing they’re doing it. I had a student back in Grad City who was taking a second class from me who plagiarized, including a long paragraph taken from the internet without properly sourcing it, indenting, etc. Really, it was just a mess. When I told her about it, she started crying. The fact that I already knew this student from a previous semester drove home to me that maybe she really didn’t know. So I think each plagiarism case is different and don’t handle each the same way. If I caught students getting a paper from a paper mill, I’d throw the book at ’em.

    All that said, my assignments are really specific, so if students are plagiarizing, they’re buying custom papers. I also require all the draftwork to be turned in, which also makes plagiarizing more time-consuming. I haven’t caught a student here yet, nor have I really suspected it.

    ~EE

  9. Since I teach Spanish and Spanish American literature and civilization, plagiarism in the upper levels is harder, since they can’t turn in something in perfect Spanish because it would be too obvious. They cannot copy without quoting from an academic essay, because that is still a level they do not master. I also give them short writing assignments throughout the semester, that they have to write in class, in order to familiarize myself with their level of Spanish. And I tell them at the beginning of the semester that something that looks obviously too well written will arise my suspicions. I still had issues, specially with what constitutes an “academic” source or not.
    What has improved the problem a lot is that I’ve started giving them very specific topics for their final paper. If they want to do something else, they have to convince me very hard. So instead of doing a final paper on a vague topic like “Tango in Argentina”, I tell them what to write about. That makes it harder for them to plagiarize (although I am sure that a few are actually successful).

  10. Since I teach Spanish and Spanish American literature and civilization, plagiarism in the upper levels is harder, since they can’t turn in something in perfect Spanish because it would be too obvious. They cannot copy without quoting from an academic essay, because that is still a level they do not master. I also give them short writing assignments throughout the semester, that they have to write in class, in order to familiarize myself with their level of Spanish. And I tell them at the beginning of the semester that something that looks obviously too well written will arise my suspicions. I still had issues, specially with what constitutes an “academic” source or not.

    What has improved the problem a lot is that I’ve started giving them very specific topics for their final paper. If they want to do something else, they have to convince me very hard. So instead of doing a final paper on a vague topic like “Tango in Argentina”, I tell them what to write about. That makes it harder for them to plagiarize (although I am sure that a few are actually successful).

  11. Since I teach Spanish and Spanish American literature and civilization, plagiarism in the upper levels is harder, since they can’t turn in something in perfect Spanish because it would be too obvious. They cannot copy without quoting from an academic essay, because that is still a level they do not master. I also give them short writing assignments throughout the semester, that they have to write in class, in order to familiarize myself with their level of Spanish. And I tell them at the beginning of the semester that something that looks obviously too well written will arise my suspicions. I still had issues, specially with what constitutes an “academic” source or not.

    What has improved the problem a lot is that I’ve started giving them very specific topics for their final paper. If they want to do something else, they have to convince me very hard. So instead of doing a final paper on a vague topic like “Tango in Argentina”, I tell them what to write about. That makes it harder for them to plagiarize (although I am sure that a few are actually successful).

  12. Since I teach Spanish and Spanish American literature and civilization, plagiarism in the upper levels is harder, since they can’t turn in something in perfect Spanish because it would be too obvious. They cannot copy without quoting from an academic essay, because that is still a level they do not master. I also give them short writing assignments throughout the semester, that they have to write in class, in order to familiarize myself with their level of Spanish. And I tell them at the beginning of the semester that something that looks obviously too well written will arise my suspicions. I still had issues, specially with what constitutes an “academic” source or not.

    What has improved the problem a lot is that I’ve started giving them very specific topics for their final paper. If they want to do something else, they have to convince me very hard. So instead of doing a final paper on a vague topic like “Tango in Argentina”, I tell them what to write about. That makes it harder for them to plagiarize (although I am sure that a few are actually successful).

  13. I teach at a small school. I usually catch about 1 plagerizer a year. (More student might plagerize but that’s what I notice.) I assign a lot of pre-writing activitiies (proposals, annotated bibs etc)and I think it helps a bit. It’s not much more work for me because they are quick to read and it makes grading the final drafts much easier…. Anyway, without fail, the plagerizers I catch are students who do not submit pre-writing (or those who submit really really horrible pre-writing assignments.) But, that being said, I have no sympathy for plagerizers. So don’t feel bad or guilty! πŸ™‚
    EA

  14. I teach at a small school. I usually catch about 1 plagerizer a year. (More student might plagerize but that’s what I notice.) I assign a lot of pre-writing activitiies (proposals, annotated bibs etc)and I think it helps a bit. It’s not much more work for me because they are quick to read and it makes grading the final drafts much easier…. Anyway, without fail, the plagerizers I catch are students who do not submit pre-writing (or those who submit really really horrible pre-writing assignments.) But, that being said, I have no sympathy for plagerizers. So don’t feel bad or guilty! πŸ™‚
    EA

  15. I teach at a small school. I usually catch about 1 plagerizer a year. (More student might plagerize but that’s what I notice.) I assign a lot of pre-writing activitiies (proposals, annotated bibs etc)and I think it helps a bit. It’s not much more work for me because they are quick to read and it makes grading the final drafts much easier…. Anyway, without fail, the plagerizers I catch are students who do not submit pre-writing (or those who submit really really horrible pre-writing assignments.) But, that being said, I have no sympathy for plagerizers. So don’t feel bad or guilty! πŸ™‚
    EA

  16. I teach at a small school. I usually catch about 1 plagerizer a year. (More student might plagerize but that’s what I notice.) I assign a lot of pre-writing activitiies (proposals, annotated bibs etc)and I think it helps a bit. It’s not much more work for me because they are quick to read and it makes grading the final drafts much easier…. Anyway, without fail, the plagerizers I catch are students who do not submit pre-writing (or those who submit really really horrible pre-writing assignments.) But, that being said, I have no sympathy for plagerizers. So don’t feel bad or guilty! πŸ™‚
    EA

  17. I haven’t had any plagiarizers in a while. But then again, it could be me just not catching them. (now I’m paranoid!) I guess it’s the one advantage to teaching a lot of freshman comp and not allowing them to do any internet research in 101. But the out-of-my-field survey; yeah, I am scared that they could be plagiarizing all over the place and I wouldn’t know because I haven’t looked at the scholarship (I have read all the wikipedia entries and sparknotes, though! How do those students think I am prepping my lectures?) πŸ˜‰
    I have done something like Dr Crazy’s speech about wanting original crap writing over someone else’s good writing, and this last semester I even wrote a sample essay for them because I don’t have anything based on this anthology. It was very very bad — almost bad enough for the bad writers in the class to recognize how bad it was. And since I only had about three pages, I plagiarized from a free essay web site to make it long enough, and when we peer reviewed the paper in class, I got them to see how it sounds different (and worse!) and then told them what I did, so I showed them that plagiarizing isn’t really going to get them passing level work anyway.
    Now I hope that they didn’t all plagiarize and get away with it on me!

  18. I haven’t had any plagiarizers in a while. But then again, it could be me just not catching them. (now I’m paranoid!) I guess it’s the one advantage to teaching a lot of freshman comp and not allowing them to do any internet research in 101. But the out-of-my-field survey; yeah, I am scared that they could be plagiarizing all over the place and I wouldn’t know because I haven’t looked at the scholarship (I have read all the wikipedia entries and sparknotes, though! How do those students think I am prepping my lectures?) πŸ˜‰

    I have done something like Dr Crazy’s speech about wanting original crap writing over someone else’s good writing, and this last semester I even wrote a sample essay for them because I don’t have anything based on this anthology. It was very very bad — almost bad enough for the bad writers in the class to recognize how bad it was. And since I only had about three pages, I plagiarized from a free essay web site to make it long enough, and when we peer reviewed the paper in class, I got them to see how it sounds different (and worse!) and then told them what I did, so I showed them that plagiarizing isn’t really going to get them passing level work anyway.

    Now I hope that they didn’t all plagiarize and get away with it on me!

  19. I haven’t had any plagiarizers in a while. But then again, it could be me just not catching them. (now I’m paranoid!) I guess it’s the one advantage to teaching a lot of freshman comp and not allowing them to do any internet research in 101. But the out-of-my-field survey; yeah, I am scared that they could be plagiarizing all over the place and I wouldn’t know because I haven’t looked at the scholarship (I have read all the wikipedia entries and sparknotes, though! How do those students think I am prepping my lectures?) πŸ˜‰

    I have done something like Dr Crazy’s speech about wanting original crap writing over someone else’s good writing, and this last semester I even wrote a sample essay for them because I don’t have anything based on this anthology. It was very very bad — almost bad enough for the bad writers in the class to recognize how bad it was. And since I only had about three pages, I plagiarized from a free essay web site to make it long enough, and when we peer reviewed the paper in class, I got them to see how it sounds different (and worse!) and then told them what I did, so I showed them that plagiarizing isn’t really going to get them passing level work anyway.

    Now I hope that they didn’t all plagiarize and get away with it on me!

  20. I haven’t had any plagiarizers in a while. But then again, it could be me just not catching them. (now I’m paranoid!) I guess it’s the one advantage to teaching a lot of freshman comp and not allowing them to do any internet research in 101. But the out-of-my-field survey; yeah, I am scared that they could be plagiarizing all over the place and I wouldn’t know because I haven’t looked at the scholarship (I have read all the wikipedia entries and sparknotes, though! How do those students think I am prepping my lectures?) πŸ˜‰

    I have done something like Dr Crazy’s speech about wanting original crap writing over someone else’s good writing, and this last semester I even wrote a sample essay for them because I don’t have anything based on this anthology. It was very very bad — almost bad enough for the bad writers in the class to recognize how bad it was. And since I only had about three pages, I plagiarized from a free essay web site to make it long enough, and when we peer reviewed the paper in class, I got them to see how it sounds different (and worse!) and then told them what I did, so I showed them that plagiarizing isn’t really going to get them passing level work anyway.

    Now I hope that they didn’t all plagiarize and get away with it on me!

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