“F” Words, Year 2, Part I

Standard

Happy New Year Everyone! I’m in the "country" and even with my network card, the internet is sketchy here, although Gramps has internet on his computer, I don’t want to hog it, so I haven’t been able to catch up on everyone’s lives this past week. It takes about 20 minutes just to get my email up. So I hope you are all doing well and relaxing until the semester begins all over again or before you head out to MLA and AHA and the like.

I was thinking about my New Year’s goals, and while I took the other blog down, I think I still have access for myself what I wrote last New Year, although since the internet is what it is here, I don’t want to spend an hour trying to bring it back up. I believe I stole Dr. Crazy’s theme of "F" words and the focus was finances, fitness, family, and fun. And you know I like to set "goals" rather than have "resolutions" because I don’t like to "resolve" to do anything.

I believe I did improve on each of the above categories this past year. I still haven’t met my weight goal, but I did finally run a marathon; I’m lifting more and heavier than I ever did in HS. While I’m not as fast in my times in running as I was in HS, I think aerobically, I’m more fit, and I was pretty damn fit in HS. I think what I want to set for my goals this year is to continue to improve upon last year’s goals.

I’ll start with fitness. I still have those pesky 18 pounds left to go. At least now we’re under 20. WW has helped, and I did awesome the first two and three quarter weeks. Look, when I set my mind to it, I can face my trigger foods like cheese and chocolate and wine. What sabotages me is BBQ shredded pork. I was fine until Christmas Day dinner. There were about three days that I just didn’t log the food at all. And those were the three days that I didn’t exercise either (except I did run Christmas Day). However, while I’m not sure if I lost weight in week three, I know for sure that I did not gain, so that’s something. At least I’m not moving backward. And it’s hard with the sketchy internet to keep track here. I have to do it in the a.m. when the internet signal seems to be best. Anyway, the revised goal is to be within 7 pounds of my goal weight by the marathon which is adjusted for a smaller weight loss goal per week and based on the fact that I’m further behind my plan as expected. However, the positive thing is that I haven’t let this discourage me. It doesn’t matter that I’m not where I thought I’d be–what matters is that I’m continually making progress toward it, and that I’ve not been crazy and depriving myself either. One thing I’ve learned in the past couple of weeks is that it is definitely about choices and about not feeling guilty about what I’m doing, and for me, I need to have small daily indulgences (like a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate) which keeps me from binging. It’s still a learning process here with the nutrition aspect since I can’t just eat whatever I want anymore without consequence, but it’s definitely helping.

Also, if we start to think about having babies this year, I don’t want to start at this weight. I got a lecture on that from a crazy person, but I don’t understand how if I feel healthy and fit and am, how that’s a bad thing for the kid. Also, if I’m trying to lose weight, then I don’t want that weight I need to lose now be tacked on to baby weight later. Why would I want to try to lose 80 pounds after having a kid than 60? Now, if it happened that I found out next week that I’m pregnant (which I won’t but hypothetically), would I be like "oh no! this sabotages my weight loss! Stupid kid, this isn’t fair!" Maybe yes, for a second, but that doesn’t mean that I can’t be fit and healthy where I am now. But if we’re going to starting thinking about this/working on this in the next 6-7 months, then why shouldn’t I think about entering into that in my best health? I don’t know. Maybe I’m a moron with some fucked up goals for pregnancy.

Another thing that I’ve learned in the last three weeks, and perhaps I’ve learned this before and I’ve forgotten, and while this might seem bad because I forget to take my meds, but I’ve figured out the key, for me, to managing my depression, too. On the one hand it’s good, on the other, it sucks because it means discipline, and clearly that’s something I suck at. But, I have found that if I work out five times a week–that seems to be the magic number–and that’s not running five times a week, it’s simply doing some kind of workout five times a week, then I am not sad. 3-4 times a week doesn’t work. Five seems to be the magic number. I’ve also got to work out for at least 45 minutes, too. Less than that doesn’t seem to do anything for my mood. I had noticed last week that I hadn’t taken my meds for two weeks, and I felt great, and still do (though I was feeling really down on the third day of not working out). I think the reason I forget to take them is because I’m not focused on how bad I feel. However, The J is monitoring me, so I have a safety net there, and I did travel with them. But it’s important for me to try to be med free and healthy because I want babies and I don’t want to be on meds with babies but I want to be healthy for my babies–physically and mentally, and if being med free means that I have to drag my lazy ass out of bed to do some kind of workout five days a week, then that’s what I do. I have also noticed too that when I do get at least five workouts in, I am significantly less likely to crave sweets, especially at night. The past three weeks on WW, too, have also made abundantly clear the difference in how I feel when I eat closer to a healthy diet than when I eat crap. I feel hungover, which doesn’t seem fair if you’ve not had anything to drink. I’m sure this is all stuff that I’ve said before, but it takes me a while to figure things out.

But again, I think the most important thing here is that the WW has alleviated the guilt of the indulgences and has made me more aware of how I feel when I put certain things into my body, what bad foods make me want more bad foods, and how important exercise is to me, my health, and my attitude. And fortunately I started all of this during the crunch time and stress of the end of the semester rather than when things are all calm and rosy, which I think helps me too.

I had no intention of writing this much about fitness.

So, my continued fitness goals: 

  1. For real and true lose the weight.
  2. Run the marathon under 5 hours.
  3. Work out five days a week–keep working on the weight lifting.
  4. Not focus so much on how I look, but how I feel.
  5. Keep working on the nutrition aspect of all of this, too.
  6. Cut back on the eating out to 1-2 times per week.
  7. Do a better job at grocery shopping and menu planning.
Advertisements

16 responses »

  1. I think the lecture on weight loss and getting pregnant is irritating but I do know several women who lost weight prior to getting pregnant by radically restricting calories and then, once pregnant, decided to just eat whatever. They effectively crashed their metabolisms and then gave themselves over to unrestrained eating while pregnant, which led to a big weight gain, probably more than they would have gained if they’d just left well-enough alone. There’s plenty of science that suggests radical calorie restriction is not a healthy way to lose weight. But seriously, that’s not what you’re talking about and anyway it’s no one’s business. It’s reasonable to want to be healthy and fit when you get pregnant.
    I would only add that you should remember that your body is gaining the weight for a purpose. If you gain 60 pounds while pregnant, it’s not going to hang onto the whole 60 pounds. It might hang onto like ten or fifteen. I read somewhere retaining about ten pounds per pregnancy is common. That’s ten pounds you don’t want but you’re not likely to be sitting on 60 stubborn pounds, even if you gain that much while pregnant.
    I’ll shut up now. πŸ˜›
    Anastasia

    • I think part of it is that I know myself and I don’t want to sit around thinking about the 15 pounds I should have lost before because that will set me up for sabotage because I won’t be able to get out my mindset about that. Part of it, too,is because I know that about 10 pounds are going to hang around, so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well. But one of my ultimate goals is to stop worrying about the weight (even though I want to get that last bit off) and more about how I feel, and aside from other life changes going on (new car, looking for new apartment, the J starting school), one of the reasons why I don’t want to try immediately is for the reason you mention above–where I’m at now, I would totally give myself free reign to eat without abandon and use the pregnancy as an excuse, screw up my metabolism, which would lead to me being miserable and being unhealthy, and being unhealthy is the last thing I want for my kids’ sakes. I think I still have some physical and mental health issues to clean up because I don’t want to be a freak about pregnancy weight gain. I really want to focus on the health and wellness aspect right now and for the future.I don’t want my kids to see me like I saw my mom–constantly dieting, yo-yo dieting at that and spending years of her life miserable about her weight and appearance, which I know has totally had an effect on how I view myself, food, and fitness, and I want my kids to have healthy attitudes about that, not neurotic ones where what they eat or don’t eat is tied into their self-esteem. That really is my primary concern.
      The person who lectured me is a nut job, first and foremost when she’s drinking, and honestly, I’m glad that we probably won’t be around her much if at all when we do actually get pregnant because she is one of those people who knows everything and would totally want to control every aspect of my body and think she has a right to at that. When she’s drunk, she also thinks she is a psychic and said some terrible things about my future pregnancies and children. But I digress. She irritates me when she drinks.
      That being said, when the time comes, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE feel free to call me out on b.s. and stupidity. I need safety nets, and I trust your judgment and advice in these matters Anastasia.

      • “so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well.”
        No, no…I don’t think that’s stupid at all. I actually lost a bit of weight prior to my first pregnancy (like maybe ten pounds) and at my six week appointment, I was 7 pounds over what I was when I got pregnant. So I was not quite what I was when I got pregnant but right where I had been (and was comfortable) for about a year prior to losing that weight. Anyway, that totally makes sense as a strategy.
        My mom was a yo-yo dieter, too, and constantly criticized her own appearance (and mine, once I got old enough) so I totally get wanting to opt out of that for the sake of any possible future children. And your own sake, really.
        I won’t regale you with loads of advice about pregnancy eating unless you get pregnant. πŸ˜› For now it will suffice to say I think the focus on health and how you feel is the right thing to cultivate.
        Anastasia

      • “so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well.”

        No, no…I don’t think that’s stupid at all. I actually lost a bit of weight prior to my first pregnancy (like maybe ten pounds) and at my six week appointment, I was 7 pounds over what I was when I got pregnant. So I was not quite what I was when I got pregnant but right where I had been (and was comfortable) for about a year prior to losing that weight. Anyway, that totally makes sense as a strategy.

        My mom was a yo-yo dieter, too, and constantly criticized her own appearance (and mine, once I got old enough) so I totally get wanting to opt out of that for the sake of any possible future children. And your own sake, really.

        I won’t regale you with loads of advice about pregnancy eating unless you get pregnant. πŸ˜› For now it will suffice to say I think the focus on health and how you feel is the right thing to cultivate.

        Anastasia

      • “so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well.”

        No, no…I don’t think that’s stupid at all. I actually lost a bit of weight prior to my first pregnancy (like maybe ten pounds) and at my six week appointment, I was 7 pounds over what I was when I got pregnant. So I was not quite what I was when I got pregnant but right where I had been (and was comfortable) for about a year prior to losing that weight. Anyway, that totally makes sense as a strategy.

        My mom was a yo-yo dieter, too, and constantly criticized her own appearance (and mine, once I got old enough) so I totally get wanting to opt out of that for the sake of any possible future children. And your own sake, really.

        I won’t regale you with loads of advice about pregnancy eating unless you get pregnant. πŸ˜› For now it will suffice to say I think the focus on health and how you feel is the right thing to cultivate.

        Anastasia

      • “so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well.”

        No, no…I don’t think that’s stupid at all. I actually lost a bit of weight prior to my first pregnancy (like maybe ten pounds) and at my six week appointment, I was 7 pounds over what I was when I got pregnant. So I was not quite what I was when I got pregnant but right where I had been (and was comfortable) for about a year prior to losing that weight. Anyway, that totally makes sense as a strategy.

        My mom was a yo-yo dieter, too, and constantly criticized her own appearance (and mine, once I got old enough) so I totally get wanting to opt out of that for the sake of any possible future children. And your own sake, really.

        I won’t regale you with loads of advice about pregnancy eating unless you get pregnant. πŸ˜› For now it will suffice to say I think the focus on health and how you feel is the right thing to cultivate.

        Anastasia

    • I think part of it is that I know myself and I don’t want to sit around thinking about the 15 pounds I should have lost before because that will set me up for sabotage because I won’t be able to get out my mindset about that. Part of it, too,is because I know that about 10 pounds are going to hang around, so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well. But one of my ultimate goals is to stop worrying about the weight (even though I want to get that last bit off) and more about how I feel, and aside from other life changes going on (new car, looking for new apartment, the J starting school), one of the reasons why I don’t want to try immediately is for the reason you mention above–where I’m at now, I would totally give myself free reign to eat without abandon and use the pregnancy as an excuse, screw up my metabolism, which would lead to me being miserable and being unhealthy, and being unhealthy is the last thing I want for my kids’ sakes. I think I still have some physical and mental health issues to clean up because I don’t want to be a freak about pregnancy weight gain. I really want to focus on the health and wellness aspect right now and for the future.I don’t want my kids to see me like I saw my mom–constantly dieting, yo-yo dieting at that and spending years of her life miserable about her weight and appearance, which I know has totally had an effect on how I view myself, food, and fitness, and I want my kids to have healthy attitudes about that, not neurotic ones where what they eat or don’t eat is tied into their self-esteem. That really is my primary concern.

      The person who lectured me is a nut job, first and foremost when she’s drinking, and honestly, I’m glad that we probably won’t be around her much if at all when we do actually get pregnant because she is one of those people who knows everything and would totally want to control every aspect of my body and think she has a right to at that. When she’s drunk, she also thinks she is a psychic and said some terrible things about my future pregnancies and children. But I digress. She irritates me when she drinks.

      That being said, when the time comes, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE feel free to call me out on b.s. and stupidity. I need safety nets, and I trust your judgment and advice in these matters Anastasia.

    • I think part of it is that I know myself and I don’t want to sit around thinking about the 15 pounds I should have lost before because that will set me up for sabotage because I won’t be able to get out my mindset about that. Part of it, too,is because I know that about 10 pounds are going to hang around, so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well. But one of my ultimate goals is to stop worrying about the weight (even though I want to get that last bit off) and more about how I feel, and aside from other life changes going on (new car, looking for new apartment, the J starting school), one of the reasons why I don’t want to try immediately is for the reason you mention above–where I’m at now, I would totally give myself free reign to eat without abandon and use the pregnancy as an excuse, screw up my metabolism, which would lead to me being miserable and being unhealthy, and being unhealthy is the last thing I want for my kids’ sakes. I think I still have some physical and mental health issues to clean up because I don’t want to be a freak about pregnancy weight gain. I really want to focus on the health and wellness aspect right now and for the future.I don’t want my kids to see me like I saw my mom–constantly dieting, yo-yo dieting at that and spending years of her life miserable about her weight and appearance, which I know has totally had an effect on how I view myself, food, and fitness, and I want my kids to have healthy attitudes about that, not neurotic ones where what they eat or don’t eat is tied into their self-esteem. That really is my primary concern.

      The person who lectured me is a nut job, first and foremost when she’s drinking, and honestly, I’m glad that we probably won’t be around her much if at all when we do actually get pregnant because she is one of those people who knows everything and would totally want to control every aspect of my body and think she has a right to at that. When she’s drunk, she also thinks she is a psychic and said some terrible things about my future pregnancies and children. But I digress. She irritates me when she drinks.

      That being said, when the time comes, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE feel free to call me out on b.s. and stupidity. I need safety nets, and I trust your judgment and advice in these matters Anastasia.

    • I think part of it is that I know myself and I don’t want to sit around thinking about the 15 pounds I should have lost before because that will set me up for sabotage because I won’t be able to get out my mindset about that. Part of it, too,is because I know that about 10 pounds are going to hang around, so my though is that I’ll preemptively lose it and then still end up where I feel comfortable afterward, which is probably ridiculous and crazy to think of it that way, but oh well. But one of my ultimate goals is to stop worrying about the weight (even though I want to get that last bit off) and more about how I feel, and aside from other life changes going on (new car, looking for new apartment, the J starting school), one of the reasons why I don’t want to try immediately is for the reason you mention above–where I’m at now, I would totally give myself free reign to eat without abandon and use the pregnancy as an excuse, screw up my metabolism, which would lead to me being miserable and being unhealthy, and being unhealthy is the last thing I want for my kids’ sakes. I think I still have some physical and mental health issues to clean up because I don’t want to be a freak about pregnancy weight gain. I really want to focus on the health and wellness aspect right now and for the future.I don’t want my kids to see me like I saw my mom–constantly dieting, yo-yo dieting at that and spending years of her life miserable about her weight and appearance, which I know has totally had an effect on how I view myself, food, and fitness, and I want my kids to have healthy attitudes about that, not neurotic ones where what they eat or don’t eat is tied into their self-esteem. That really is my primary concern.

      The person who lectured me is a nut job, first and foremost when she’s drinking, and honestly, I’m glad that we probably won’t be around her much if at all when we do actually get pregnant because she is one of those people who knows everything and would totally want to control every aspect of my body and think she has a right to at that. When she’s drunk, she also thinks she is a psychic and said some terrible things about my future pregnancies and children. But I digress. She irritates me when she drinks.

      That being said, when the time comes, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE feel free to call me out on b.s. and stupidity. I need safety nets, and I trust your judgment and advice in these matters Anastasia.

  2. I think the lecture on weight loss and getting pregnant is irritating but I do know several women who lost weight prior to getting pregnant by radically restricting calories and then, once pregnant, decided to just eat whatever. They effectively crashed their metabolisms and then gave themselves over to unrestrained eating while pregnant, which led to a big weight gain, probably more than they would have gained if they’d just left well-enough alone. There’s plenty of science that suggests radical calorie restriction is not a healthy way to lose weight. But seriously, that’s not what you’re talking about and anyway it’s no one’s business. It’s reasonable to want to be healthy and fit when you get pregnant.

    I would only add that you should remember that your body is gaining the weight for a purpose. If you gain 60 pounds while pregnant, it’s not going to hang onto the whole 60 pounds. It might hang onto like ten or fifteen. I read somewhere retaining about ten pounds per pregnancy is common. That’s ten pounds you don’t want but you’re not likely to be sitting on 60 stubborn pounds, even if you gain that much while pregnant.

    I’ll shut up now. πŸ˜›

    Anastasia

  3. I think the lecture on weight loss and getting pregnant is irritating but I do know several women who lost weight prior to getting pregnant by radically restricting calories and then, once pregnant, decided to just eat whatever. They effectively crashed their metabolisms and then gave themselves over to unrestrained eating while pregnant, which led to a big weight gain, probably more than they would have gained if they’d just left well-enough alone. There’s plenty of science that suggests radical calorie restriction is not a healthy way to lose weight. But seriously, that’s not what you’re talking about and anyway it’s no one’s business. It’s reasonable to want to be healthy and fit when you get pregnant.

    I would only add that you should remember that your body is gaining the weight for a purpose. If you gain 60 pounds while pregnant, it’s not going to hang onto the whole 60 pounds. It might hang onto like ten or fifteen. I read somewhere retaining about ten pounds per pregnancy is common. That’s ten pounds you don’t want but you’re not likely to be sitting on 60 stubborn pounds, even if you gain that much while pregnant.

    I’ll shut up now. πŸ˜›

    Anastasia

  4. I think the lecture on weight loss and getting pregnant is irritating but I do know several women who lost weight prior to getting pregnant by radically restricting calories and then, once pregnant, decided to just eat whatever. They effectively crashed their metabolisms and then gave themselves over to unrestrained eating while pregnant, which led to a big weight gain, probably more than they would have gained if they’d just left well-enough alone. There’s plenty of science that suggests radical calorie restriction is not a healthy way to lose weight. But seriously, that’s not what you’re talking about and anyway it’s no one’s business. It’s reasonable to want to be healthy and fit when you get pregnant.

    I would only add that you should remember that your body is gaining the weight for a purpose. If you gain 60 pounds while pregnant, it’s not going to hang onto the whole 60 pounds. It might hang onto like ten or fifteen. I read somewhere retaining about ten pounds per pregnancy is common. That’s ten pounds you don’t want but you’re not likely to be sitting on 60 stubborn pounds, even if you gain that much while pregnant.

    I’ll shut up now. πŸ˜›

    Anastasia

  5. I think it’s totally reasonable to want to be at a good weight before you get pregnant. In fact, my mother suggested it to me at one point, not that I followed her advice. I can’t imagine the kind of lecture you got that would say otherwise actually. 60 pounds, by the way, is a lot to gain during a pregnancy. 30-40, I think, is more the norm. And after you have the baby, a lot of that sheds off — that is, you don’t have to work for it. I’m about where I was before I had Tot, maybe a couple pounds over. I’ve never tried to lose weight since his birth. When you get closer to preggers, start taking folic acid, when you’re trying (not once you’re pregnant, but when you’re trying). (There’s my lecture. All done.) What weirdo says that it’s not a good idea to be at your healthiest when you get pregnant? Of course it is!
    You know I had a nutritional midwife when I was pregnant, which I totally recommend. I know a lot of people just eat whatever they want — and I support that in theory. But really, the best thing is to eat really healthy food when pregnant, just more of it. Of course, if you’re laid up with terrible morning sickness, as some women are, then you take what you can get. (My step-mother threw up the morning of her schedule c-section with my sister. She gained practically no weight at all because she couldn’t eat. On the other hand, my midwife recommended that I eat really healthily at one particular point, and so there was this one point during my pregnancy when I was still getting bigger pregger-wise, but some fat just melted off me because I was eating so well.)
    Anyhoo, I’ll shut up now. You’re fine is what I’m saying. Now if you start putting off having your Triplet Boys because you’re not thin enough, well, then I’ll start bugging you (and sending you Folic Acid in the mail – ha ha ha).
    EE

  6. I think it’s totally reasonable to want to be at a good weight before you get pregnant. In fact, my mother suggested it to me at one point, not that I followed her advice. I can’t imagine the kind of lecture you got that would say otherwise actually. 60 pounds, by the way, is a lot to gain during a pregnancy. 30-40, I think, is more the norm. And after you have the baby, a lot of that sheds off — that is, you don’t have to work for it. I’m about where I was before I had Tot, maybe a couple pounds over. I’ve never tried to lose weight since his birth. When you get closer to preggers, start taking folic acid, when you’re trying (not once you’re pregnant, but when you’re trying). (There’s my lecture. All done.) What weirdo says that it’s not a good idea to be at your healthiest when you get pregnant? Of course it is!

    You know I had a nutritional midwife when I was pregnant, which I totally recommend. I know a lot of people just eat whatever they want — and I support that in theory. But really, the best thing is to eat really healthy food when pregnant, just more of it. Of course, if you’re laid up with terrible morning sickness, as some women are, then you take what you can get. (My step-mother threw up the morning of her schedule c-section with my sister. She gained practically no weight at all because she couldn’t eat. On the other hand, my midwife recommended that I eat really healthily at one particular point, and so there was this one point during my pregnancy when I was still getting bigger pregger-wise, but some fat just melted off me because I was eating so well.)

    Anyhoo, I’ll shut up now. You’re fine is what I’m saying. Now if you start putting off having your Triplet Boys because you’re not thin enough, well, then I’ll start bugging you (and sending you Folic Acid in the mail – ha ha ha).

    EE

  7. I think it’s totally reasonable to want to be at a good weight before you get pregnant. In fact, my mother suggested it to me at one point, not that I followed her advice. I can’t imagine the kind of lecture you got that would say otherwise actually. 60 pounds, by the way, is a lot to gain during a pregnancy. 30-40, I think, is more the norm. And after you have the baby, a lot of that sheds off — that is, you don’t have to work for it. I’m about where I was before I had Tot, maybe a couple pounds over. I’ve never tried to lose weight since his birth. When you get closer to preggers, start taking folic acid, when you’re trying (not once you’re pregnant, but when you’re trying). (There’s my lecture. All done.) What weirdo says that it’s not a good idea to be at your healthiest when you get pregnant? Of course it is!

    You know I had a nutritional midwife when I was pregnant, which I totally recommend. I know a lot of people just eat whatever they want — and I support that in theory. But really, the best thing is to eat really healthy food when pregnant, just more of it. Of course, if you’re laid up with terrible morning sickness, as some women are, then you take what you can get. (My step-mother threw up the morning of her schedule c-section with my sister. She gained practically no weight at all because she couldn’t eat. On the other hand, my midwife recommended that I eat really healthily at one particular point, and so there was this one point during my pregnancy when I was still getting bigger pregger-wise, but some fat just melted off me because I was eating so well.)

    Anyhoo, I’ll shut up now. You’re fine is what I’m saying. Now if you start putting off having your Triplet Boys because you’re not thin enough, well, then I’ll start bugging you (and sending you Folic Acid in the mail – ha ha ha).

    EE

  8. I think it’s totally reasonable to want to be at a good weight before you get pregnant. In fact, my mother suggested it to me at one point, not that I followed her advice. I can’t imagine the kind of lecture you got that would say otherwise actually. 60 pounds, by the way, is a lot to gain during a pregnancy. 30-40, I think, is more the norm. And after you have the baby, a lot of that sheds off — that is, you don’t have to work for it. I’m about where I was before I had Tot, maybe a couple pounds over. I’ve never tried to lose weight since his birth. When you get closer to preggers, start taking folic acid, when you’re trying (not once you’re pregnant, but when you’re trying). (There’s my lecture. All done.) What weirdo says that it’s not a good idea to be at your healthiest when you get pregnant? Of course it is!

    You know I had a nutritional midwife when I was pregnant, which I totally recommend. I know a lot of people just eat whatever they want — and I support that in theory. But really, the best thing is to eat really healthy food when pregnant, just more of it. Of course, if you’re laid up with terrible morning sickness, as some women are, then you take what you can get. (My step-mother threw up the morning of her schedule c-section with my sister. She gained practically no weight at all because she couldn’t eat. On the other hand, my midwife recommended that I eat really healthily at one particular point, and so there was this one point during my pregnancy when I was still getting bigger pregger-wise, but some fat just melted off me because I was eating so well.)

    Anyhoo, I’ll shut up now. You’re fine is what I’m saying. Now if you start putting off having your Triplet Boys because you’re not thin enough, well, then I’ll start bugging you (and sending you Folic Acid in the mail – ha ha ha).

    EE

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s